Check Current Burning Restrictions

The Minnesota DNR announced Monday April 13, 2020 burning restrictions to the counties where DNR administers open burning to reduce additional stress on statewide emergency response network.

Consistent with Governor Tim Walz’s executive orders to help ensure the health and safety of all Minnesotans, the Department of Natural Resources is proactively moving to burning restrictions immediately after snowmelt to reduce potential for wildfire and emergency response. Burning restrictions apply to the counties where DNR administers open burning. The burning restrictions map indicates accurate restrictions by county and is updated daily. The state will not activate burning permits in these counties until restrictions are lifted. Small recreational fires or campfires are still allowed. The DNR will grant variance permits only for agricultural field and construction site preparation and limited prescribed burning. Call your local DNR Forestry Office if you are seeking a variance.
With this year’s spring wildfire season coinciding with the COVID-19 pandemic and emergency response, the DNR and state agencies are working to reduce additional risks and stressors on an already taxed emergency response network.
Please know that:
– Burning restrictions limit the number of emergency responses, which keeps first responders focused on critical public services.
– Many wildland firefighters are also emergency responders for local fire departments, ambulances, and other emergency response activities.
– The DNR is putting these cautionary measures in place for the health and safety of all Minnesotans. – – Private landowners can do their part to support COVID-19 response efforts by following burning restrictions and being safe with fire.
Stay up-to-date
Visit the DNR’s fire danger & burning restrictions webpage for daily updates. Check for your burning permit information by county.
Alternatives to burning
Escaped debris burns are the number one cause of wildfires. Alternatives to burning include composting, chipping, or taking brush to a collection site. For information on how to compost yard debris, visit the DNR’s guide to composting yard debris.